cl_maintenanceAndUpdateFrequency

asNeeded

1119 record(s)

 

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    WIS/GTS bulletin WTPQ23RJTD; in code form: PLAIN LANGUAGE; disseminated via: RTH TOKYO; remarks: TYPHOON ADVISORY FOR ANALYSIS AND FORECAST.

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    Radial data files contain radial components of sea surface parameters measured by HF ocean radars operated by Australian Coastal Ocean Radar Network (ACORN), a facility of Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS). Regardless of the radar system (WERA or SeaSonde), the primary product is the radial component of the sea surface current along a line between the radar station and a point on the sea surface. By combining radials measured at two stations surface current vectors can be constructed. These surface current vectors can then be used to study tides, wind-driven currents and perform lagrangian particle tracking. Raw data collected at each radar site are re-processed by ACORN in order to assign quality control flags to data points. This is not possible in real-time because real-time data are produced by proprietary manufacturer software without quality control flags and it is not feasible to transfer the raw data to ACORN in real-time. Each radial file contains a set of standard metadata fields, such as radar system type, operating frequency and bandwidth. Other metadata fields describe radar system type-specific parameters. Radial file metadata fields are described in a separate ACORN data document. In addition, for WERA radar systems, ACORN provides quality controlled heights of left and right bragg peaks, from which the wind direction can be inferred.

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    The Red Head (RHED) HF ocean radar site (33.010245 S 151.727059 E) is one of two HF ocean radars covering the Newcastle area, New South Wales. The other HF ocean radar station is at Seal Rocks. The HF ocean radar coverage is from the coast to beyond the edge of the continental shelf. The RHED HF ocean radar is a SeaSonde crossed-loop direction finding array. This radar operates at a frequency of 5.2625 MHz, with a bandwidth of 25 KHz, a maximum range of 200 Km and a range resolution of 6 Km. Within the HF radar coverage area surface current radials are measured.

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    The Seal Rocks (SEAL) HF ocean radar site (32.441575 S 152.539022 E) is one of two HF ocean radars covering the Newcastle area, New South Wales. The other HF ocean radar station is at Red Head. The HF ocean radar coverage is from the coast to beyond the edge of the continental shelf. The SEAL HF ocean radar is a SeaSonde crossed-loop direction finding array. This radar operates at a frequency of 5.2625 MHz, with a bandwidth of 25 KHz, a maximum range of 200 Km and a range resolution of 6 Km. Within the HF radar coverage area surface current radials are measured.

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    The Nora Creina (NOCR) HF ocean radar site (37.329 S 139.850 E) is one of two HF ocean radars covering the Bonney Coast, South Australia. The other HF ocean radar station is at Blackfellows Cave. The HF ocean radar coverage is from the coast to beyond the edge of the continental shelf. The NOCR HF ocean radar is a SeaSonde crossed-loop direction finding array. This radar operates at a frequency of 5.211 MHz, with a bandwidth of 50 KHz, a maximum range of 200 Km and a range resolution of 3 Km. The antenna bearing is 255 deg true east of north (approximately west by south-west). Within the HF radar coverage area surface current radials are measured. This station was decommissioned in March 2017.

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    The Blackfellows Cave (BFCV) HF ocean radar site (37.940 S 140.457 E) is one of two HF ocean radars covering the Bonney Coast, South Australia. The other HF ocean radar station is at Nora Creina. The HF ocean radar coverage is from the coast to beyond the edge of the continental shelf. The BFCV HF ocean radar is a SeaSonde crossed-loop direction finding array. This radar operates at a frequency of 5.211 MHz, with a bandwidth of 50 KHz, a maximum range of 200 Km and a range resolution of 3 Km. The antenna bearing is 257 deg true east of north (approximately west by south-west). Within the HF radar coverage area surface current radials are measured. This station was decommissioned in March 2017.

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    The IMOS Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Facility operates an ocean going AUV called Sirius capable of undertaking high resolution, geo-referenced survey work. This platform is a modified version of a mid-size robotic vehicle Seabed built at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. This class of AUV has been designed specifically for relatively low speed, high resolution imaging and is passively stable in pitch and roll. The objectives of the IMOS AUV Facility are to provide access and operational support for AUV systems for the marine science community in Australia. The Facility currently operates an AUV designed for high-resolution seafloor imaging. This vehicle (IMOS platform code:SIRIUS) is available to support marine research based on an on-going call for proposals. The AUV facility is based at the Australian Centre for Field Robotics within the School of Aeorospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering at the University of Sydney.

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    The Green Head (GHED) HF ocean radar site (30.073 S 114.967E) is one of two HF ocean radars covering Rottnest Shelf and Perth Canyon on the Turquoise Coast north of Perth. The other HF ocean radar station is at Seabird, or Lancelin from 2013-03-19. The HF ocean radar coverage is from the coast to beyond the edge of the continental shelf. The GHED HF ocean radar is a SeaSonde crossed-loop direction finding array. This radar operates at a frequency of 5.211 MHz, with a bandwidth of 50 KHz, a maximum range of 200 Km and a range resolution of 3 Km. The antenna bearing is 288 deg true east of north (approximately west by north-west). Within the HF radar coverage area surface current radials are measured.

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    Flow cytometry data was collected in January 2009, in waters off South Australia. The general purpose of the study is to be able to establish background knowledge on the ecosystem on the continental shelf of South Australia and the impact of upwelling/saline outflow events on microbial communities to ultimately develop a biogeochemical model of the region. Sampling was carried out during cruises conducted on board the RV Ngerin as part of the Southern Australian Integrated Marine System (SAIMOS). During each cruise, the physical, chemical and biological properties of the chlorophyll fluorescence maximum (FM) layer were investigated. Flow cytometry data has been collected for picophytoplankton, bacteria and viruses. Six main stations have been sampled over the course of the study, five are located on the 100 m isobath, i.e. RS (35.508S, 136.278E), B2 (35.418S, 136.148E), B3 (35.258S, 136.048E), B4 (35.168S, 135.418E) and B5 (35.008S, 135.198E), and one from an offshore station (B1; 36.188S, 136.178E) located southwest of Kangaroo Island. Note that combining the distances between stations (14–25 nautical miles), the average component of the current velocity at middepth along the shelf (0.01 m s21) and the average speed of the vessel (i.e. 9 knots) indicate that different water masses were sampled at each station. Additional samples have on occasion been collected from the National Reference Station (NRS) at Kangaroo Island (35.832S, 136.447E) and the SA Spencer Gulf Mouth Mooring (SAM8SG, 35.25S, 136.690E), where the saline outflow occurs.

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    Temperate WA (Kendrick, Babcock, Smale): A cruise was undertaken in collaboration with the University of Western Australian and CSIRO to document benthic assemblages on temperate reefs off the coast of Western Australia in April, 2010. This cruise was the first in a 3 year series of IMOS AUV Facility cruises intended to establish a benthic habitat timeseries along the Eastern and Western coasts of Australia. The expectation is that these surveys will be repeated annually for at least the next two years. Surveys were conducted off Rottnest Island, Jurien Bay, and the Abrolhos Islands. Six sites were surveyed at each location spanning three depths (15 m, 25 m, 40 m), both inside and outside MPAs, with three 25 m x 25 m full photo coverage quadrants devoted to each site. Site locations targeted kelp beds and were provided by the science party. The locations of individual quadrants within each site were decided on‐site, based on bathymetric or depth sounder information. Additional scientific operations carried out during the cruise consisted of CTD casts, HOBO logger equipped moorings deployments, and SCUBA.