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2012

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    ALADIN model forecast: surface parameters for +6h-72h time range, based on 00 and 12 UTC run. Surface parameters: MSLP ; Temperature 2m ; DD wind 10m ; FF wind 10m ; DD wind gust 10m; FF wind gust 10m ; precipitation ; at a limitated area in 0.02x0.02 grid. GRIB format

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    ---- The bulletin is coded as BUFR code form: FM 94 (BUFR, Binary universal form for the representation of meteorological data) . (Refer to WMO No.306 - Manual on Codes for the definition of WMO international codes) ---- The IUSD05 TTAAii Data Designators decode (2) as: T1 (I): Observational data (Binary coded) - BUFR. T2 (U): Upper air. A1 (S): Radiosondes/pibal reports from fixed land stations (entire sounding) TEMP (parts A, B, C, D). A2 (D): 90°E - 0° northern hemisphere. (2: Refer to WMO No.386 - Manual on the GTS - Attachment II.5) ---- Correspondence with the C13 common BUFR/CREX code table: (002/004) or (Vertical soundings (other than satellite) -- Upper-level temperature/humidity/wind reports from fixed-land stations (TEMP)) data type / data sub-type. ---- The bulletin collects reports from stations: Goteborg/landvetter ---- WMO No.9 - Volume C1 'Remarks' field: COMPLETE SOUNDING

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    The high alpine research station Jungfraujoch is situated on a mountain saddle between the two mountains Jungfrau (4158m asl) and Mönch (4099m asl). The station is located in the center of Europe at an altitude of 3580m asl and is surrounded by highly industrialized regions at much lower altitudes. This special geographical situation offers the opportunity to monitor background concentrations but also to investigate the transport of anthropogenic pollutants from the boundary layer to the free troposphere. Due to the surrounding topography, local winds are mainly from north-west and south-east with north-west being the predominant direction. The annual mean temperature is -8C.

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    This data was collected in August 2011 by the IMOS Ship of Opportunity Underway CO2 Measurement research group on RV Southern Surveyor (IMOS platform code: VLHJ) voyage SS2011_V03. Departed: Hobart, TAS, Aug 01, 2011 Arrived: Hobart, TAS, Aug 10, 2011 CO2 System Overview: The fugacity of carbon dioxide (fCO2) in surface seawater was measured using a General Oceanics Inc. automated system (Model 8050; Pierrot et al 2009). Seawater is sprayed into an equilibration chamber and CO2 in the headspace gas equilibrates with the seawater. The headspace gas is pumped through a thermoelectric condenser followed by a nafion drying tube before flowing through a Licor 7000 non-dispersive infrared gas analyser used to measure the CO2 mole fraction (XCO2) of the dried air. The gas flow is stopped temporarily for the CO2 measurements, which are made at atmospheric pressure. A set of four CO2 standards that cover the range of CO2 values expected in the ocean are analysed about every four hours to calibrate the gas analyser. The standard gas concentrations are on the WMO-X2007 mole fraction scale for CO2-in-air. Atmospheric XCO2 (dry) is measured after the standards by pumping clean outside air from an intake on the forward mast of the ship. Seawater intake and ancillary data: The seawater intake is located at about 5.5m depth in the bow of the ship. Sea surface salinity is measured using a thermosalinograph (Seabird Electronics SBE21) located next to the CO2 system. A remote temperature sensor (Seabird Electronics SBE 38) located at the intake is used to measure sea surface temperature (SST). The travel time between the intake and CO2 system is typically about 4 minutes with warming usually less than 0.6ºC. The thermosalinograph water is from the same intake, but the supply lines separate after the intake. A comparison of thermosalinograph and equilibrator temperature records shows the temperature difference in the two lines is generally less than 0.1ºC. The thermosalinograph water line travels outside the ship and is typically warmer than the equilibrator. The travel time in water line to the thermosalinograph is 2.5 minutes faster than to the equilibrator. Meteorological data, salinity, SST, and ships position and time are taken from the ships logging system. These parameters and the data quality are maintained by the Australian Marine National Facility.

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    This data was collected in May 2011 by the IMOS Ship of Opportunity Underway CO2 Measurement research group on RV Southern Surveyor (IMOS platform code: VLHJ) voyage SS2011_T01. Departed: Hobart, TAS, May 04, 2011 Arrived: Brisbane, QLD, May 12, 2011 CO2 System Overview: The fugacity of carbon dioxide (fCO2) in surface seawater was measured using a General Oceanics Inc. automated system (Model 8050; Pierrot et al 2009). Seawater is sprayed into an equilibration chamber and CO2 in the headspace gas equilibrates with the seawater. The headspace gas is pumped through a thermoelectric condenser followed by a nafion drying tube before flowing through a Licor 7000 non-dispersive infrared gas analyser used to measure the CO2 mole fraction (XCO2) of the dried air. The gas flow is stopped temporarily for the CO2 measurements, which are made at atmospheric pressure. A set of four CO2 standards that cover the range of CO2 values expected in the ocean are analysed about every four hours to calibrate the gas analyser. The standard gas concentrations are on the WMO-X2007 mole fraction scale for CO2-in-air. Atmospheric XCO2 (dry) is measured after the standards by pumping clean outside air from an intake on the forward mast of the ship. Seawater intake and ancillary data: The seawater intake is located at about 5.5m depth in the bow of the ship. Sea surface salinity is measured using a thermosalinograph (Seabird Electronics SBE21) located next to the CO2 system. A remote temperature sensor (Seabird Electronics SBE 38) located at the intake is used to measure sea surface temperature (SST). The travel time between the intake and CO2 system is typically about 4 minutes with warming usually less than 0.6ºC. The thermosalinograph water is from the same intake, but the supply lines separate after the intake. A comparison of thermosalinograph and equilibrator temperature records shows the temperature difference in the two lines is generally less than 0.1ºC. The thermosalinograph water line travels outside the ship and is typically warmer than the equilibrator. The travel time in water line to the thermosalinograph is 2.5 minutes faster than to the equilibrator. Meteorological data, salinity, SST, and ships position and time are taken from the ships logging system. These parameters and the data quality are maintained by the Australian Marine National Facility.

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    Flow cytometry data was collected in January 2009, in waters off South Australia. The general purpose of the study is to be able to establish background knowledge on the ecosystem on the continental shelf of South Australia and the impact of upwelling/saline outflow events on microbial communities to ultimately develop a biogeochemical model of the region. Sampling was carried out during cruises conducted on board the RV Ngerin as part of the Southern Australian Integrated Marine System (SAIMOS). During each cruise, the physical, chemical and biological properties of the chlorophyll fluorescence maximum (FM) layer were investigated. Flow cytometry data has been collected for picophytoplankton, bacteria and viruses. Six main stations have been sampled over the course of the study, five are located on the 100 m isobath, i.e. RS (35.508S, 136.278E), B2 (35.418S, 136.148E), B3 (35.258S, 136.048E), B4 (35.168S, 135.418E) and B5 (35.008S, 135.198E), and one from an offshore station (B1; 36.188S, 136.178E) located southwest of Kangaroo Island. Note that combining the distances between stations (14–25 nautical miles), the average component of the current velocity at middepth along the shelf (0.01 m s21) and the average speed of the vessel (i.e. 9 knots) indicate that different water masses were sampled at each station. Additional samples have on occasion been collected from the National Reference Station (NRS) at Kangaroo Island (35.832S, 136.447E) and the SA Spencer Gulf Mouth Mooring (SAM8SG, 35.25S, 136.690E), where the saline outflow occurs.

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    This data was collected in April 2011 by the IMOS Ship of Opportunity Underway CO2 Measurement research group on RV Southern Surveyor (IMOS platform code: VLHJ) voyage SS2011_V01. Departed: Hobart, TAS, Apr 16, 2011 Arrived: Hobart, TAS, Apr 21, 2011 CO2 System Overview: The fugacity of carbon dioxide (fCO2) in surface seawater was measured using a General Oceanics Inc. automated system (Model 8050; Pierrot et al 2009). Seawater is sprayed into an equilibration chamber and CO2 in the headspace gas equilibrates with the seawater. The headspace gas is pumped through a thermoelectric condenser followed by a nafion drying tube before flowing through a Licor 7000 non-dispersive infrared gas analyser used to measure the CO2 mole fraction (XCO2) of the dried air. The gas flow is stopped temporarily for the CO2 measurements, which are made at atmospheric pressure. A set of four CO2 standards that cover the range of CO2 values expected in the ocean are analysed about every four hours to calibrate the gas analyser. The standard gas concentrations are on the WMO-X2007 mole fraction scale for CO2-in-air. Atmospheric XCO2 (dry) is measured after the standards by pumping clean outside air from an intake on the forward mast of the ship. Seawater intake and ancillary data: The seawater intake is located at about 5.5m depth in the bow of the ship. Sea surface salinity is measured using a thermosalinograph (Seabird Electronics SBE21) located next to the CO2 system. A remote temperature sensor (Seabird Electronics SBE 38) located at the intake is used to measure sea surface temperature (SST). The travel time between the intake and CO2 system is typically about 4 minutes with warming usually less than 0.6ºC. The thermosalinograph water is from the same intake, but the supply lines separate after the intake. A comparison of thermosalinograph and equilibrator temperature records shows the temperature difference in the two lines is generally less than 0.1ºC. The thermosalinograph water line travels outside the ship and is typically warmer than the equilibrator. The travel time in water line to the thermosalinograph is 2.5 minutes faster than to the equilibrator. Meteorological data, salinity, SST, and ships position and time are taken from the ships logging system. These parameters and the data quality are maintained by the Australian Marine National Facility.

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    Solitary Islands (Barrett, Jordan, Hayes): Dives in the Solitary Islands were focused on surveying reef habitats around the Solitary Island Marine Park. The surveys were conducted as part of a collaboration between the IMOS AUV Facility, the National Environment Research Program (NERP) Theme 1 - National monitoring, evaluation and reporting and NSW DPI Fisheries. Dives focused on a number of reefs in 20 m to 60 m of water depth and consisted of both dense 25 m x 25 m full photo quadrants designed to allow repeat surveys over years and broader surveys up to 2km in length to document habitat distributions over broader scales. Additional scientific operations carried out at these sites include multibeam bathymetry, towed video and Baited Remote Underwater Video Stations (BRUVS).

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    The objectives of the work in SE Queensland (Nov. 2011) was to revisit dive sites inside and outside of a green zone offshore of Moreton Island. There were a few issues associated with working on a small vessel and on the final day of operations the AUV was lost in part due to the vessel not having sufficient fuel to stay on station when the vehicle did not surface on the completion of its dive. An extensive search was conducted over the following three days using Coast Guard vessels and aerial search but the AUV was not located. Two weeks later the vehicle washed ashore some 100km to the North of the site where it was last seen. It had sustained relatively little damage but this incident highlights the vulnerability of the Facility to the loss of its one asset. An ARC LIEF proposal has been submitted to support the development of multiple, smaller AUVs to help maintain the AUV Facility observing program

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    Flow cytometry data was collected in July 2011, in waters off South Australia. The general purpose of the study is to be able to establish background knowledge on the ecosystem on the continental shelf of South Australia and the impact of upwelling/saline outflow events on microbial communities to ultimately develop a biogeochemical model of the region. Sampling was carried out during cruises conducted on board the RV Ngerin as part of the Southern Australian Integrated Marine System (SAIMOS). During each cruise, the physical, chemical and biological properties of the chlorophyll fluorescence maximum (FM) layer were investigated. Flow cytometry data has been collected for picophytoplankton, bacteria and viruses. Six main stations have been sampled over the course of the study, five are located on the 100 m isobath, i.e. RS (35.508S, 136.278E), B2 (35.418S, 136.148E), B3 (35.258S, 136.048E), B4 (35.168S, 135.418E) and B5 (35.008S, 135.198E), and one from an offshore station (B1; 36.188S, 136.178E) located southwest of Kangaroo Island. Note that combining the distances between stations (14–25 nautical miles), the average component of the current velocity at middepth along the shelf (0.01 m s21) and the average speed of the vessel (i.e. 9 knots) indicate that different water masses were sampled at each station. Additional samples have on occasion been collected from the National Reference Station (NRS) at Kangaroo Island (35.832S, 136.447E) and the SA Spencer Gulf Mouth Mooring (SAM8SG, 35.25S, 136.690E), where the saline outflow occurs.