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    Sable Island is a remote crescent-shaped “sandbar” located at 43°56'N and 60°01'W in the Atlantic Ocean, approximately 275 km east-southeast of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The Island is about 44 km long with little over 1 km wide at its widest point, and has maximum elevation of about 10 m. The terrain along the shoreline is flat with the interior containing two large saltwater ponds and a series of rolling sand dunes covered with small patches of grass and shrubs. Vegetation on the Island is very sparse. Public access is restricted. The Island is also a refuge for wild horses, seals and migratory birds. The weather station and air chemistry observatory is located approximately 8 km from the western end of the Island, 100 m from the north beach and 800 m from the south beach. Sable island is predominantly influenced by airflow originating from the North American continent and thus provides an excellent platform to assess the influence of anthropogenic and terrestrial emissions from the North American continent to the troposphere.

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    In 1986, the Alert Background Air Pollution Monitoring Network (BAPMoN) Observatory was opened as Canada's first research station for the continuous monitoring of background concentrations of trace gases and aerosols. Currently, the Dr. Neil Trivett Global Atmosphere Watch Observatory at Alert, NU is the most northerly site in the GAW Network. It is located on the northeastern tip of Ellesmere Island in Nunavut, Canada at 82º28'N and 62º30'W, far removed from the major industrial regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Alert is also the site of a military station (CFS Alert) staffed with about 60 personnel, and an Environment Canada Upper Air Weather Station. The Alert GAW Observatory is approximately 400 m2 in size and is situated 210 m above sea level and 6 km SSW of CFS Alert. It is a key site for Arctic atmospheric process studies, which have led to the discovery of such phenomena as Arctic haze, important chemical interactions of pollutants with snow surfaces, and rapid changes in the chemical composition of the atmospheric boundary layer during polar sunrise. The program at Alert has grown substantially since its inception. A team of Canadian scientists, working in partnership with international scientists, maintains the extensive measurement program at Alert. The measurement and research of trace atmospheric constituents thought to have an impact on climate remains a primary function for this station.

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    In 1986, the Alert Background Air Pollution Monitoring Network (BAPMoN) Observatory was opened as Canada's first research station for the continuous monitoring of background concentrations of trace gases and aerosols. Currently, the Dr. Neil Trivett Global Atmosphere Watch Observatory at Alert, NU is the most northerly site in the GAW Network. It is located on the northeastern tip of Ellesmere Island in Nunavut, Canada at 82º28'N and 62º30'W, far removed from the major industrial regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Alert is also the site of a military station (CFS Alert) staffed with about 60 personnel, and an Environment Canada Upper Air Weather Station. The Alert GAW Observatory is approximately 400 m2 in size and is situated 210 m above sea level and 6 km SSW of CFS Alert. It is a key site for Arctic atmospheric process studies, which have led to the discovery of such phenomena as Arctic haze, important chemical interactions of pollutants with snow surfaces, and rapid changes in the chemical composition of the atmospheric boundary layer during polar sunrise. The program at Alert has grown substantially since its inception. A team of Canadian scientists, working in partnership with international scientists, maintains the extensive measurement program at Alert. The measurement and research of trace atmospheric constituents thought to have an impact on climate remains a primary function for this station.

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    In 1986, the Alert Background Air Pollution Monitoring Network (BAPMoN) Observatory was opened as Canada's first research station for the continuous monitoring of background concentrations of trace gases and aerosols. Currently, the Dr. Neil Trivett Global Atmosphere Watch Observatory at Alert, NU is the most northerly site in the GAW Network. It is located on the northeastern tip of Ellesmere Island in Nunavut, Canada at 82º28'N and 62º30'W, far removed from the major industrial regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Alert is also the site of a military station (CFS Alert) staffed with about 60 personnel, and an Environment Canada Upper Air Weather Station. The Alert GAW Observatory is approximately 400 m2 in size and is situated 210 m above sea level and 6 km SSW of CFS Alert. It is a key site for Arctic atmospheric process studies, which have led to the discovery of such phenomena as Arctic haze, important chemical interactions of pollutants with snow surfaces, and rapid changes in the chemical composition of the atmospheric boundary layer during polar sunrise. The program at Alert has grown substantially since its inception. A team of Canadian scientists, working in partnership with international scientists, maintains the extensive measurement program at Alert. The measurement and research of trace atmospheric constituents thought to have an impact on climate remains a primary function for this station.

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    In 1986, the Alert Background Air Pollution Monitoring Network (BAPMoN) Observatory was opened as Canada's first research station for the continuous monitoring of background concentrations of trace gases and aerosols. Currently, the Dr. Neil Trivett Global Atmosphere Watch Observatory at Alert, NU is the most northerly site in the GAW Network. It is located on the northeastern tip of Ellesmere Island in Nunavut, Canada at 82º28'N and 62º30'W, far removed from the major industrial regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Alert is also the site of a military station (CFS Alert) staffed with about 60 personnel, and an Environment Canada Upper Air Weather Station. The Alert GAW Observatory is approximately 400 m2 in size and is situated 210 m above sea level and 6 km SSW of CFS Alert. It is a key site for Arctic atmospheric process studies, which have led to the discovery of such phenomena as Arctic haze, important chemical interactions of pollutants with snow surfaces, and rapid changes in the chemical composition of the atmospheric boundary layer during polar sunrise. The program at Alert has grown substantially since its inception. A team of Canadian scientists, working in partnership with international scientists, maintains the extensive measurement program at Alert. The measurement and research of trace atmospheric constituents thought to have an impact on climate remains a primary function for this station.

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    Estevan Point is a lighthouse station located in the midsection of Vancouver Islands west coast. The site can only be reached by boat or helicopter. The beach is about 100 m from the lighthouse. The lighthouse complex is surrounded to the north, east and south by forest and to the west by the Pacific Ocean. In June 1992, a weekly sampling program was initiated at Estevan Point. Samples were initially collected on the beach when winds were greater than 5 m s-1 using single valve evacuated flasks. In January 1993, MSC began a pressurized flask-sampling program, using 2-litre double-valve flasks. These samples are taken at the top of the 39-metre lighthouse tower. Currently, the weekly flask-samples are analysed for CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6, CO and H2 as well as for the isotopes of 13C and 18O in CO2. Continuous observations programs for CO2, CH4 and CO were initiated in 2009

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    Coast of Arctic Ocean