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    Abstract: Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the University of South Alabama, the Alabama Department of Conservation, State Land Division, Coastal Program, the Environmental Protection Agency's Gulf of Mexico Program and the Alabama Lighthouse Association to provide real-time wave and current data from Middle Bay Lighthouse in Mobile Bay, AL. Near real-time data are available in a user-friendly format at www.mymobilebay.com. Informative pop-ups describe each parameter and graphs of each may be displayed for the visitor to the website. Researchers may download the data in a spreadsheet format for further analysis. Purpose: The value of coastal observing systems is recognized by the U.S. Congress, the National Ocean Partnership Program, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration. Recent reports by the Pew Oceans Commission and U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy have decried the lack of information from near coastal waters on which to base management decisions and recommended monitoring programs linked to strong research. Reasons for continuous, real-time observations of meteorological and hydrographic parameters include (1) continuous characterization of spatial and temporal patterns of change in water quality, (2) development of a permanent record of significant and human caused changes in environmental indicators over time, and (3) support for research activities through the availability of consistent, scientifically valid data. An additional benefit of real-time observation is the potential for the public to track and learn about water quality conditions. Many coastal dwellers are uninformed about conditions in nearby estuaries because they do not have access to current information about parameters such as water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen levels and water level and they may fail to appreciate the complexity of interactions in estuarine ecosystems.

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    Abstract: Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the Alabama Department of Conservation and Mobile County to provide real-time meteorological and hydrographic data from Cedar Point, AL. Near real-time data are available in a user-friendly format at www.mymobilebay.com. Informative pop-ups describe each parameter and graphs of each may be displayed for the visitor to the website. Researchers may download the data in a spreadsheet format for further analysis. Purpose: The value of coastal observing systems is recognized by the U.S. Congress, the National Ocean Partnership Program, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration. Recent reports by the Pew Oceans Commission and U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy have decried the lack of information from near coastal waters on which to base management decisions and recommended monitoring programs linked to strong research. Reasons for continuous, real-time observations of meteorological and hydrographic parameters include (1) continuous characterization of spatial and temporal patterns of change in water quality, (2) development of a permanent record of significant and human caused changes in environmental indicators over time, and (3) support for research activities through the availability of consistent, scientifically valid data. An additional benefit of real-time observation is the potential for the public to track and learn about water quality conditions. Many coastal dwellers are uninformed about conditions in nearby estuaries because they do not have access to current information about parameters such as water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen levels and water level and they may fail to appreciate the complexity of interactions in estuarine ecosystems.

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    Abundances of viruses, prokaryotes, diatoms, dinoflagellates, ciliates and heterotrophic nanoflagellates were determined over time in mesocosm experiments measuring the effects of oil, dispersant and dispersed oil on the microbial loop. Two separate experiments were carried out in June and August 2011. Abundances in the treated mesocosms were compared to a no addition control and a glucose addition control. Purpose: These experiments were designed to quantify the effects of oil, dispersant and dispersed oil on the coastal pelagic microbial food web.

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    Abstract: Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the the Alabama Department of Conservation, State Land Division, Coastal Program and the Environmental Protection Agency's Gulf of Mexico Program to provide real-time meteorological and hydrographic data from Dauphin Island, AL. Near real-time data are available in a user-friendly format at www.mymobilebay.com. Informative pop-ups describe each parameter and graphs of each may be displayed for the visitor to the website. Researchers may download the data in a spreadsheet format for further analysis. Purpose: The value of coastal observing systems is recognized by the U.S. Congress, the National Ocean Partnership Program, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration. Recent reports by the Pew Oceans Commission and U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy have decried the lack of information from near coastal waters on which to base management decisions and recommended monitoring programs linked to strong research. Reasons for continuous, real-time observations of meteorological and hydrographic parameters include (1) continuous characterization of spatial and temporal patterns of change in water quality, (2) development of a permanent record of significant and human caused changes in environmental indicators over time, and (3) support for research activities through the availability of consistent, scientifically valid data. An additional benefit of real-time observation is the potential for the public to track and learn about water quality conditions. Many coastal dwellers are uninformed about conditions in nearby estuaries because they do not have access to current information about parameters such as water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen levels and water level and they may fail to appreciate the complexity of interactions in estuarine ecosystems.

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    These unprojected (geographic coordinates) 3-Zone Average Annual Salinity Digital Geographies are based on analysis of long-term salinity data for 147 estuaries of the contiguous United States. Each estuary is subdivided into three zones between the head(s) of tide, and the seaward boundaries based on annual-averaged and depth-averaged salinities. The salinities used to define the three zones are: (1) Tidal Fresh Zone (0 to 0.5 parts per thousand); (2) Mixing Zone (0.5 to 25 parts per thousand); (3) Seawater Zone (25 parts per thousand or greater). This 3-zone scheme is considered static rather than dynamic, because it does not take into account the seasonal variations in salinity patterns and stratification that occur in most estuaries. Nonetheless, it provides a simple and readily understandable way to depict the long-term salinity characteristics of U.S. estuarine waters. Note that not all estuaries contain all three zones - for example, Baffin Bay, Texas, receives relatively little annual freshwater inflow, and is considered to be entirely Seawater Zone. This 3-zone scheme was originally presented in the National Estuarine Inventory (NEI) Data Atlas, Vol. I (NOAA/NOS 1985) for 92 estuaries of the contiguous United States. In the 1990s, digital geographies were refined and many estuaries were added to become a key layer within the Coastal Assessment Framework (NOAA 2007). These 3-Zone Average Annual Salinity Digital Geography have been used for applications in natural resource science and management. They provided the spatial framework and basis for development of NOAA's Estuarine Living Marine Resources (ELMR) Program (Nelson and Monaco 2000), and also for NOAA's National Estuarine Eutrophication Assessment (Bricker et al. 2007).

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    The Phytoplankton Monitoring Network (PMN) is a part of the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). The PMN was created as an outreach program to connect volunteers and professional scientists in the monitoring of marine phytoplankton and harmful algal blooms (HABs). NOAA staff train volunteers on sampling techniques and identification methods for marine phytoplankton. There are over 50 genera, including 10 potentially toxin producing genera, of dinoflagellates and diatoms on the volunteers watch list. A qualitative collection of data that includes salinity, temperature, depth, wind speed and direction, phytoplankton counts and abundance ratios obtained from surface tows in the estuarine and marine environments. Purpose: Goals set forth by PMN: to create a comprehensive list of marine phytoplankton and potentially harmful algal species; to monitor and maintain an extended survey area year-round; to isolate areas prone to harmful algal blooms (HABs) for further study by researchers; to identify general trends, such as time and area, where HABs are more likely to occur; to increase public awareness of phytoplankton and HABs through education and outreach; to increase public awareness of research conducted by federal, state, and private researchers; to support communication and interaction between researchers and the public via PMN volunteers.

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    These data are a collection of benthic habitat data from studies conducted in the coastal Long Island Sound, NY region in GIS shapefile (.shp, .dbf, .shx, and .prj files) with associated Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Generalized browse graphics were generated by the NODC and are included with the data. Individual subdirectories include data as follows - 2002 Long Island South Shore Estuary Benthic Habitat Polygon Data Set, 1995 benthic grab, sediment grab, and sediment profile image GIS point data files from inland harbor bays (Jamaica Bay), and 1994-1995 benthic grab, sediment grab, and sediment profile image GIS point data files from lower inland harbor bays.